Issue 16 Dante Page 3

An Irregular Magazine More about Junction Box

Click on the green page numbers to link to required page. Page 1 Editorial Fran Lock: With my Protecting Angels I Navigate Hell Pierre Joris: This Afternoon Dante Steph Goodger: Inferno Ellen Dillon: Seeking Dantist Allen Fisher: Proceeds in the Garden; after Dante Eléna Rivera: Speak Robert Hampson: Piazza dei Signori Philip Terry: Purgatorio Canto XI Beth Greenhalgh: Lethe Peter Hughes and David Rees: Let's Dantz   Page 2 David Annwn: Dantesserae Lee Duggan: from 'Navigation' David Rees Davies: for Dante montenegrofisher: Dragonflies Rebecca Chesney: To the Uncommitted Ian Brinton: Canto V of Inferno, plus Dante and Beckett Stephen Emmerson: a line through a circle Susan Adams: The Ha Ha Man Tom Jenks: Spiral Texts Penny...

Simon Collings: Commedia

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My original impulse was the making of the installation. I had an outline for each of the three rooms: the tiered auditorium and the garbage bags you encounter first, the black tiled floor of the second room with the single white tile lit from above, the old rose fragrance, and the orrery in the third. As I worked on the project I began adding more detail. The frosted glass floor where you exit the auditorium, and the contorted bodies visible beneath, came of course from the poem. The flies and the rats in the first room arrived of their own accord. I documented the process in a series of photographs, which is my normal practice. But I felt the pictures lacked a sense of movement. This is very important in the different sections of the work, and of course the soundscape was also missing....

Nerys Williams: This New Life

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This New Life In grieving love                         Cymer fy llygaid See thought my sight it frames the imaginary recentring space occupying the circumference How love becomes my body                         Anadl mewn                                      cri’r canu                         F’ enaid noeth Bleached  and bounded Soul-saviour nude                         Canna f’enaid yn y gwaed Downward sight its encounter Love’s pallor                         Canna fi // cana fi Sing the rememory clear sighted salt-lipped.   Proem At the age of nine the girl...

Doug Jones: Purgatory

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from Posts 26/8/21 “In Purgatory, golf. All the human thinks/believes. golf. Oldman plays the young man the old man emerges more Sunshine, Jehovah – a supply boat on the field, full of poems, trinkets, sleeps. Father having some bad day. The play is awful, course complex – all tasks seem tanked.skewed. Then, there is this dream triple eagle. A marvellous, turquoise idol. Father professes his delight. His game is done” 2/9/21 “Thought of Bill, in purgatory the other day. An assumption he would hate. Were at the traveller’s camp with police, colleagues – to get the Romany to have the jab. Politely, they said no. Why always no? To a 2nd site, illegal, out back in hard Norfolk nature mask, red – advancing on the polyester cast of our copper’s gear – and...

Angela Gardner: The Painful Abyss

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Angela Gardner: 'The Painful Abyss' is a long piece I wrote using mutations or springboards from Dante's Paradise and Inferno in the original Italian. It was written while I was learning Italian (I still am) so it very much includes misunderstandings and meanderings from the original text.  I allowed it to lose itself in the dark wood and become an unfaithful translation. At the time of writing the Iraq war was beginning and then in progress. Even at a distance and mediated by news reports I was incensed. We marched and nothing came of it, wars keep going, mutating and springboarding as part of the military industrial capitalist endeavour.   To read the poem: The Painful Abyss ANGELA GARDNER is a Welsh/Australian artist and poet. Her verse novel The Sorry Tale of the Mignonette is...

Chris McCabe: midpoint

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  Chris McCabe’s work spans artforms and genres including poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama and visual art. His work has been shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award and the Republic of Consciousness Prize. His latest poetry collection, The Triumph of Cancer is a Poetry Book Society Recommendation and he is the editor of several anthologies including Poems from the Edge of Extinction: An Anthology of Poetry in Endangered Languages. His first novel, Dedalus, is a sequel to Ulysses; his second, Mud, a version of the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, set beneath Hampstead Heath. He is working on an epic series of psychogeographical books documenting the lost poets buried in London's Victorian cemeteries, the latest of which is Buried Garden: Lockdown with the Lost Poets of Abney Park...

Tessa Waite: upriver

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTRDxAvYBB0 (To watch this video full-screen click on the title and name, top-left in the video window. This will take you to Youtube). Tessa Waite: Recently I have been developing new strands of my practice including movement and performance. I recently attended a Teatro Lambe Lambe course where I learnt about this intimate theatre form, created and shared from a box with one person at a time. The piece shown here is my first experiment in condensing and expressing ideas within this new form, with transformation as a core theme. The process took me back to the potency of childhood imagination, something I wish to bring to the fore in my work. http://www.tessawaite.co.uk   Click here to go back to: Contributors and Links to Pages 1 - 4

Lyndon Davies: Two Soundpoems

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I've become interested in making experiments in the sonic extension of the poem, by means of the recording and intercutting of voice, saxophone improvisation and found materials. The technologies I use are basic, the medium for montage a bog-standard Garage Band programme. This first short piece was made after a visit to Pisa, as one of a series of four called Pisan Elegies. These fuse material found on location with elements constructed later. Elegy 3 refers to the Ugolino passage near the end of the Inferno. The Torre della Fame where Ugolino and his sons and grandsons were imprisoned and left to starve can still, at least in part, be seen on the Piazza dei Cavalieri in Pisa. https://soundcloud.com/yndonlasfrynavies/pisan-elegies-3?si=8a76271282994b95b5b786b97b309e59 The second piece...

Anthony Mellors: Canto

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Canto 'The supremely important thing is that we should not lose sight of the poetic reality through being too meticulous in our search for the right interpretation'. – Umberto Cosmo 'Look, the main thing is that I don’t come a cropper!' – J.Lacan   channeling concrete the water less concrete adheres to an aesthetic of failure the success of it avoiding downcycle flanging & print-through due to the accumulation of tramp elements in secondary metals cascading yet the value of the upcycle which remains to be seen precycle saturation of data processing delivered straight to your front door unpatterned circle on the back that once held a label chicken supreme still around in timewarp diet of paste and weak tea Ah, Beatrice (Laura) yellow of the...

Peter Larkin: Engladings

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These poems are loosely derived from the Welsh englyn penfyr, traditionally involving a stanza of 3 lines, the first with 10 syllables, the second with 5-6 and the third with 7. I have more basically and less fleetly substituted a word-count for the syllabics and forgot the second line was intended to be at least one syllable shorter, so my pattern is a line of 10 words followed by two of seven. One poem goes for a fourth line. Some of the contributory material is filtered through translations provided by Francesco Benozzi in his excellent Landscape Perception in Early Celtic Literature (2004).   Engladings (Englynion)  [extract] 1 Never a settled stance at enhancing unless the hills petition: after preaching sedentary green to the island greener thirst of any chance-pliant plant 2 Tree...

  Scott Thurston: A note on the text and video. This poem, and the kinepoetic performance that accompanies it, are taken from my pamphlet Figure Detached Figure Impermanent (Oystercatcher, 2014), a series of thirty prose poems which coincided with my first reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Various images and phrases from Dante thread through the series, and, whilst the most obvious reference in this poem (to Hell) is actually derived from Winston Churchill’s famous remark ‘if you’re going through hell, keep going’, the reference to ‘love’s will’ more clearly derives from Dante’s movement into Paradise where, under Beatrice’s guidance, he learns to follow what gives him pleasure as his Will has now been purified by Divine Love. More specifically, the opening...

Graham Hartill: Cosmology

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Cosmology 1 It is deepening Autumn now in the valley of Grwynefechan. I am walking the top road, looking down, remembering the prisoners I worked with and all their insatiable cravings: “The thing is Gray, you do it once, then you spend the rest of your life trying to get that high again. And you never make it.” High again. And it’s not only drugs, of course; you do it once, then after that you’re sunk: “13 seconds, that’s all it took, then ever since then I was waiting for that knock to come on the door. It was like a relief when it came. Of course, now I’ll always be one of them. I’m branded forever.” And their victims won’t be the same again either, affected forever. The path is full of briars that have spread all summer long, stretched limp across the tarmac. The road...

Glasfryn Project

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